Labour MPs stick two fingers up to their Leave voting constituents

When MPs vote against a Bill at third reading in the House of Commons, they are attempting to press the nuclear button. A vote at third reading is the final vote. A vote against it is a vote to destroy the Bill. Oppositions, of course, regularly vote to destroy Bills that they dislike at third reading, however, when it comes to the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill which cleared its Commons stages yesterday, many of the Labour MPs who voted against were doing so in full opposition to the majority of their constituents wishes.

I am not saying that this Bill is perfect – I don’t think that any Bill that seeks to transfer powers back from the EU in such a short timescale ever could be. Many MPs are concerned that too much power will be transferred to the Government, however, those same MPs didn’t bat an eyelid when numerous powers were being transferred from the UK to Brussels. It is the worst type of hypocrisy. 

But this Bill is essential. If the opposition had won the day, we would have been in a complete mess. Even poorer, rushed legislation would have had to be enacted, or (which I am sure those MPs voting against really want) Brexit would have been delayed or even reversed if the delays went on long enough. Continue reading “Labour MPs stick two fingers up to their Leave voting constituents”

You are in office, but not in power, Prime Minister. You have to go

I didn’t see that election result coming, although if I had used some foresight, I would have done.

I made a number of predictions about Labour marginals before Theresa May launched the Conservative manifesto. Until then, I firmly believe that all was well. The campaign wasn’t very good at that point, however, there was time for improvement.

After the manifesto was launched, the wheels came off. Theresa May couldn’t even admit she had performed a U-turn on the so-called “dementia tax”. The campaign was too presidential. Saying “me and my team” is not only an incorrect use of English grammar, it also makes Theresa May look self-centred. Continue reading “You are in office, but not in power, Prime Minister. You have to go”

Now is the time for Conservatives to hold their nerve

A general election campaign wouldn’t be the same if the Conservative Party didn’t have a wobble. The Thursday a week before election day in 1987 was known as “Wobbly Thursday”. A rogue poll in the Daily Telegraph showed the Conservative lead down to just four points. Panic ensued. A week later, Margaret Thatcher secured a third term in office with a majority of 102.

There is a trend in the polls at the moment which appears to show Labour closing the gap. This is hardly surprising. I don’t think anyone seriously thought that the Conservatives were twenty points ahead. But although I don’t think that the Conservatives will get 400+ seats (something I thought highly likely a month ago), I do think it is still possible that they will gain an extra 50 seats. Something around that figure would give Theresa May a landslide 100+ seat majority.

I’ve come to this conclusion for two main reasons. Continue reading “Now is the time for Conservatives to hold their nerve”

Corbyn is popular with many voters because they don’t have to pay (directly)

“Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavours to live at the expense of everybody else.” Those words by Frédéric Bastiat, a French economist, were uttered almost two hundred years’ ago. I am sure that he didn’t ponder too much, if at all, about what life would be like in 2017, yet his words should be resonating throughout this general election campaign.

In many ways, Labour has been clever with its taxation plans. If Jeremy Corbyn becomes Prime Minister, he plans to increase taxes on those earning above £80,000 a year. That’s less than 5 per cent of UK incomes. In other words, it doesn’t affect more than 95 per cent of the electorate. It’s very easy to be in favour of tax increases when you don’t have to pay. Continue reading “Corbyn is popular with many voters because they don’t have to pay (directly)”

Is the Conservative Party trying to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory?

I was looking through some old articles I had written before the 2010 general election. Although we now have a Conservative Prime Minister, and taking into account that all of the main party leaders have changed and Labour should be a basket case under Jeremy Corbyn, it’s amazing how so many of the issues covered in the article are still relevant today.

Immigration is still a major issue. The current Government is still nowhere near eliminating the deficit – and Government debt is now not far off double what it was in 2010. Theresa May still pursues many of the anti-libertarian policies we saw under Labour in the Blair/Brown years. Economically, the Conservative Party is moving in a leftwards direction under May, and even more so rejects free market policies in favour of state intervention.

Back in February 2010, I thought there would be a hung Parliament, and I couldn’t say which party would be the largest.

At this general election, I would be shocked if Jeremy Corbyn became Prime Minister, but the cock-up over the so-called ‘dementia tax’, coupled with what is in general a very disappointing manifesto, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Conservatives are doing everything they can to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. Continue reading “Is the Conservative Party trying to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory?”