You are in office, but not in power, Prime Minister. You have to go

I didn’t see that election result coming, although if I had used some foresight, I would have done.

I made a number of predictions about Labour marginals before Theresa May launched the Conservative manifesto. Until then, I firmly believe that all was well. The campaign wasn’t very good at that point, however, there was time for improvement.

After the manifesto was launched, the wheels came off. Theresa May couldn’t even admit she had performed a U-turn on the so-called “dementia tax”. The campaign was too presidential. Saying “me and my team” is not only an incorrect use of English grammar, it also makes Theresa May look self-centred. Continue reading “You are in office, but not in power, Prime Minister. You have to go”

Now is the time for Conservatives to hold their nerve

A general election campaign wouldn’t be the same if the Conservative Party didn’t have a wobble. The Thursday a week before election day in 1987 was known as “Wobbly Thursday”. A rogue poll in the Daily Telegraph showed the Conservative lead down to just four points. Panic ensued. A week later, Margaret Thatcher secured a third term in office with a majority of 102.

There is a trend in the polls at the moment which appears to show Labour closing the gap. This is hardly surprising. I don’t think anyone seriously thought that the Conservatives were twenty points ahead. But although I don’t think that the Conservatives will get 400+ seats (something I thought highly likely a month ago), I do think it is still possible that they will gain an extra 50 seats. Something around that figure would give Theresa May a landslide 100+ seat majority.

I’ve come to this conclusion for two main reasons. Continue reading “Now is the time for Conservatives to hold their nerve”

Is the Conservative Party trying to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory?

I was looking through some old articles I had written before the 2010 general election.¬†Although we now have a Conservative Prime Minister, and taking into account that all of the main party leaders have changed and Labour should be a basket case under Jeremy Corbyn, it’s amazing how so many of the issues covered in the article are still relevant today.

Immigration is still a major issue. The current Government is still nowhere near eliminating the deficit – and Government debt is now not far off double what it was in 2010. Theresa May still pursues many of the anti-libertarian policies we saw under Labour in the Blair/Brown years. Economically, the Conservative Party is moving in a leftwards direction under May, and even more so rejects free market policies in favour of state intervention.

Back in February 2010, I thought there would be a hung Parliament, and I couldn’t say which party would be the largest.

At this general election, I would be shocked if Jeremy Corbyn became Prime Minister, but the cock-up over the so-called ‘dementia tax’, coupled with what is in general a very disappointing manifesto, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Conservatives are doing everything they can to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. Continue reading “Is the Conservative Party trying to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory?”

The blame for the social care policy shambles is entirely the Conservatives’ fault

The lady is for turning, because no matter how much CCHQ tries to spin it, today we saw the first wobble and U-turn in this general election campaign.

I thought the policy announced last week during the unveiling of the Conservative manifesto was a sensible one. If you can’t look after elderly parents and they need long-term care, why should you expect to inherit their house in full and expect taxpayers to pick-up the bill for their care? Continue reading “The blame for the social care policy shambles is entirely the Conservatives’ fault”

Margaret Thatcher’s principles still have a role to play in 21st Century politics

In the Conservative manifesto, Theresa May once again had a pop at those of us on the libertarian right. Once again she described our views as an “ideological template”. There is no doubt that whatever Mayism is, it is certainly not Thatcherism. She has done her best – and has so far succeeded – in putting an ocean between her and the most successful Conservative Prime Minister of the 20th Century.

What I find curious is the notion that if you identity yourself as a Thatcherite you are somehow stuck in the past. If Margaret Thatcher were still alive today and was about to become Prime Minister, she would apply her principles to the problems of today. Continue reading “Margaret Thatcher’s principles still have a role to play in 21st Century politics”